hypertriglyceridemia

Gymnema (Gymnema sylvestre)

gymnema.jpg

Gymnema Overview:

Gymnema is known as "the sugar destroyer" because after chewing the leaves, the tongue is no longer able to taste sweet flavours.

It's been used for thousands of years in India for treating conditions involving "sweet urine". This is a common symptom of diabetes as sugar diffuses intot he urinary tract. Old methods of diagnosis involved tasting the urine to identify a sweet taste.

Gymnema offers a variety of unique benefits towards conditions like diabetes, including changes to the pancreatic beta-cells, responsible for releasing insulin into the blood.

Gymnema is also a diuretic, helping to clear glucose from the blood through urine (in combination with plenty of water of course).

Finally, gymnema leaves inhibit the sweet sensation on the taste buds, maing food taste blnd and dull, which can be used to reduce the cravings for sweet (high sugar) foods responsible for maintaining the pathophysiology of diabetes and metabolic syndromes like PCOS, and metabolic syndrome.

 

+ Indications

  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Tooth infection
  • PCOS
  • Hypertriglyceridemia

+ Contraindications

  • Caution advised with hypoglycemic drugs

+ Mechanisms

  • Inreases the number of insulin-secreting beta cells in the pancreas
  • Decreases the perception of sweet taste on the taste buds
  • Inhibits peripheral utilization of glucose by somatotrophin and corticotrophin.

Main Herbal Actions:

  • Antidiabetic
  • Hypocholesterolemic
  • Suppresses Sweet Taste
  • Diuretic
  • Refridgerant
  • Astringent
 

How Do I Use Gymnema?

Gymnema is mainly used to treat metabolic conditions like diabetes and metabolic syndrome. It's also used for dental carries, and poor digestion.

 

Weekly Dose

Part Used

  • Leaves

Family Name

  • Apocynaceae

Distribution

  • Southeast Asia

Follow Us On Social Media

Constituents of Interest

  • Gymnemic acids
  • Gymnemasaponins
  • Gurmarin
  • Betaine

Common Names

  • Gymnema
  • The Sugar Destroyer
  • Gurmar

CYP450

  • CYP3A4
  • CYP2C9
  • CYP1A2
  • CYP2D6

Quality

  • Unknown

Pregnancy

  • No adverse effects expected.

Taste

  • Dull (Blocks sweet receptors on the tongue)

Duration of Use

  • Suitable for long term use.
 

Botanical Info:

Gymnema is a member of the Apocynaceae (dogbane) family of plants. It was formerly included in the milkweed (Asclepiadaceae) family, however, this has since beenchanged to a subfamily category. The Apocynaceae family now contains 5 subfamilies (Apocynoideae, Asclepiadoideae, Periplocoideae, Rauvolfioideae, and Secamonoideae). It contains 5100 species, and 366 genera. There are roughly 50 different species of Gymnema, many of which are used interchangeably.

Many plants in the Apocynaceae family are trees preferring tropical environments, however, some will also grow in deserts.

 

Research Overview:

Still compiling research.

 

Clinical Applications Of Gymnema:

Gymnema is mainly used for metabolic conditions including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, metabolic syndrome, PCOS, hypertriglyceridemia, and both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It's diuretic, and increases the number of pancreatic beta cells. Additionally, it eliminates the ability to taste sweetness after cheing the leaves, helping to gradually reduce cravings and prevent high sugar intake in habituated individuals.

 

Cautions:

High saponins may cause gastrointestinal upset, caution advised with high doses.

Caution advised if taking hypoglyemic medication due to agonistic interaction.

 

Author:

Justin Cooke

The Sunlight Experiment

(Updated November 2018)

 

Recent Blog Posts:

Iris (Iris versicolor)

iris-versicolor.jpg

Iris Overview:

Iris is a misunderstood herb in many circles. It contains a set of constituents that are known to trigger nausea and vomiting. Ironically, in small doses iris is useful for treating nausea however. Iris has mild laxative qualities, which is though to be due to a combination between its potent bitter constituents stimulating the flow of bile from the liver and gallbladder, and an ability to stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system. It's especially active on the liver, where it's used to treat poor digestion, liver dysfunction, and to treat skin conditions.

Other species sometimes used includes Iris caroliniana & Iris virginica.

Monograph Coming Soon

 

+ Indications

  • Diabetes
  • Dysmenorrhea
  • Eczema
  • Endometriosis
  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Hypertriglyceridemia
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Lymphadenopathy
  • Pancreatic dysfunctions
  • Poor digestion
  • Psoriasis
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Skin conditions
  • Supporting weight loss
  • Urinary tract infections

+ Contraindications

  • Avoid high doses
  • Mucus membrane irritation (IBS, IBD, etc)
  • Diarrhea

+ Mechanisms

  • Thought to stimulate parasympathetic nervous system
  • Iridin thought to induce laxative action due to irritating properties on mucus membranes

Main Herbal Actions:

  • Bitter
  • Pancreatic trophorestorative
  • Alterative
  • Antinflammatory
  • Astringent
  • Lymphatic
  • Hepatic
  • Laxative (mild)
  • Diuretic
  • Choleretic
  • Cholagogue
 

Main Uses:

Iris is used to treat skin conditions through the liver by improving elimination pathways and preventing excessive elimination and irritation through the skin. It's useful for acne, psoriasis, eczema, and rashes.

Other common uses of iris is for urinary tract infection, hypothyroidism, lymphadenopathy, and menstrual irregularities.

 

Daily Dosage

Liquid Extract

Ratio: 1:2

3-6 mL

Weekly Dosage

Liquid Extract

Ratio: 1:2

20-40 mL

 

Part Used

Root/Rhizome

Family Name

Iridaceae

Distribution

North America

Follow Us On Social Media

Constituents of Interest

  • Furfural
  • Irisin
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Oleo-resin, beta-sitosterols
  • Beta-sitosterols

Common Names

  • Iris
  • Blue Flag
  • Sweet Flag
  • Poison Flag
  • Harlequin Blueflag
 

Botanical Info:

Iris is native to North America, and is common around marshes, streams, and lakes.

The Iridaceae family is named specifically after the irises, and refers to the rainbow due to the many colors of irises available. This family contains 66 different genera, and approximatly 2244 different species. Some of the other famous members of this family include Crocus spp., and Gladioli spp.

 

Research Overview:

still compiling research.

Level Of Research:

Clinical Applications Of Iris:

Iris has recently seen a peak in interest in the past few years, however, is still not a commonly used herb due to the presence of significant side effects. Iris is contraindicated in anything but small doses due to the mucus membrane irritant and nauseating side effects. In small doses however, iris is useful for stimulating bile secretion, promoting movement in the bowels, stimulating the pancreas, and treating skin conditions arising from liver congestion.

 

Cautions:

Some of the constituents in fresh iris root can cause a burning sensation in the mouth and throat along with diarrhea and abdominal burning. It's considered an emetic, and mucus membrane irritant in higher doses. Use cautiously and only in smaller doses.

 
 

Monograph Coming Soon

 

Recent Blog Posts:

Turmeric (Curcuma longa)

Turmeric is one of the oldest herbal medicines in the world. The benefits of turmeric are many, and its broad yet powerful actions have landed it among the most highly...

Hawthorn (Crataegus oxycantha)

Hawthorn berries and leaves are considered one of the best cardiotonic herbs on earth. They are used as a preventative for heart diseases of all different kinds...

Barberry (Berberis spp.)

Berberis is the genus name for a group of species that contain the alkaloid known as berberine. This alkaloid is a potent antibacterial, which is especially useful for...

Globe Artichoke (Cynara scolymus)

Artichoke is a popular food crop, and potent anticholesterol medication. Its bitter components improve digestion, reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels, as well as...