leg ulcers

Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum)

horse chestnut leaf and seed

Horse Chestnut Summary

Horse chestnut is a large tree with a long history of use for treating vascular conditions like varicose veins and other forms of poor vascular tone.

Its common name originated from a belief that horse chestnut seeds were able to relieve panting horses.

 

+ Indications

  • Poor vascular tone
  • Vericose veins
  • Burst blod vessels
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Phelbitis
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Frostbite
  • Leg ulcers
  • Chronic venous insufficiency

+ Contraindications

  • Pregnancy
  • Breast feeding
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease
  • Anticoagulant medication use

Herbal Actions:

  • Astringent
  • Antinflammatory
  • Decongestant
  • Antioxidant
  • Antirheumatic
  • Analgesic
  • Expectorant
  • Vasoprotective
 

What is Horse Chestnut Used For?

Horse chestnut is mainly used for its astringent and anti-inflammatory activity specific to the vascular system. It's also used for fluid accumulation, chest pain, rheumatism, neuralgia, hemorrhoids, and sinus congestion.

 

Herb Details: Horse Chestnut

Weekly Dose

Part Used

  • Seeds

Family Name

  • Sapindaceae

Distribution

  • Europe & North America

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Constituents of Interest

  • Aescin

Common Names

  • Horsechestnut
  • Conker Tree
  • Atkestanesi
  • Buckeye
  • Eschilo

Duration of Use

  • Long term use of horse chestnut is acceptable.
 

Botanical Information

The Sapindaceae family of plants contains 138 genera, and 1858 different species. The Aesculus genus contains 13-19 different species. Other famous members of the Sapindacea family include maple (Acer spp.), lychee (Litchi chinensis), longan (Dimocarpus longan), Guarana (Paulinia cupana) Ackee (Blighia sapida).

 

Research Overview:

still compiling research

 

Clinical Applications Of Horse Chestnut:

Horsechestnut is a reliable vascular tonic, suitable for most forms of vascular insufficiency or fluid retention. Varicose veins, spider veins, burst blood vessels, and peripheral vascular and arterial insufficiency are all indicated for use wth horsechestnut internally.

 

Cautions:

The esculin may be toxic in higher doses. Many horsechestnut extracts will remove this component to improve safety.

Do not use horsechestnut in combination with pregnancy or breastfeeding.

 

Author:

Justin Cooke, BHSc

The Sunlight Experiment

(Updated May 2019)

 

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